What Is The Prognosis Of Epilepsy?

Does epilepsy affect memory?

Any type of epileptic seizure could potentially affect your memory, either during or after a seizure.

If you have lots of seizures, memory problems might happen more often.

Some people have generalised seizures that affect all of the brain..

What are the long term effects of epilepsy?

Status epilepticus is an especially dangerous epilepsy complication because it can cause permanent brain damage. Death is also a possibility. Weight gain: Certain antiseizure medications can make weight loss and management more challenging. Being overweight can then increase your risk for other chronic health problems.

Can you ever be cured of epilepsy?

There’s no cure for epilepsy, but early treatment can make a big difference. Uncontrolled or prolonged seizures can lead to brain damage. Epilepsy also raises the risk of sudden unexplained death. The condition can be successfully managed.

Does epilepsy run in families?

Some types of epilepsy run in families and are both inherited and genetic. Not all epilepsies that are due to genetic causes are inherited. In general, if a person’s mother, father or sibling has epilepsy, their risk of developing epilepsy by the age of 40 is less than 1 in 20.

What percentage of epilepsy is genetic?

About 30 to 40 percent of epilepsy is caused by genetic predisposition. First-degree relatives of people with inherited epilepsy have a two- to four-fold increased risk for epilepsy.

What foods should you avoid if you have epilepsy?

white bread; non-wholegrain cereals; biscuits and cakes; honey; high-sugar drinks and foods; fruit juices; chips; mashed potatoes; parsnips; dates and watermelon. In general, processed or overcooked foods and over-ripe fruits.

What happens if epilepsy is left untreated?

If epilepsy is not treated, seizures may occur throughout a person’s life. Seizures can become more severe and happen more often over time. Epilepsy can be caused by tumors or improperly formed blood vessels.

What is the most severe form of epilepsy?

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe form of epilepsy that typically becomes apparent during infancy or early childhood. Affected children experience several different types of seizures most commonly atonic, tonic and atypical absence seizures.

Is epilepsy a life threatening condition?

Most seizures end on their own and don’t cause serious problems. During some seizures, people can injure themselves, develop other medical problems, or have a life-threatening emergency. The overall risk of dying for people with epilepsy is 1.6 to 3 times higher than for people without epilepsy.

What triggers epilepsy?

Triggers are situations that can bring on a seizure in some people with epilepsy. Some people’s seizures are brought on by certain situations. Triggers can differ from person to person, but common triggers include tiredness and lack of sleep, stress, alcohol, and not taking medication.

Does epilepsy count as a disability?

What is a disability? … Epilepsy is a physical, long-term condition and people with epilepsy are protected under the Equality Act, even if their seizures are controlled or if they don’t consider themselves to be ‘disabled’.

Does epilepsy affect married life?

Longitudinal studies have found that epilepsy has an adverse impact on marriage, even among individuals with controlled ES or who have not taken antiepileptic drugs (AED) for years [10,18,19]. Female PWE are less likely to marry, have more marital problems, and divorce more than male PWE with similar clinical …

What is the life expectancy of someone with epilepsy?

Reduction in life expectancy can be up to 2 years for people with a diagnosis of idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy, and the reduction can be up to 10 years in people with symptomatic epilepsy. Reductions in life expectancy are highest at the time of diagnosis and diminish with time.

What percentage of epilepsy patients die?

Each year, more than 1 in 1,000 people with epilepsy die from SUDEP. This is the leading cause of death in people with uncontrolled seizures. Orrin Devinsky MD talks about SUDEP (sudden unexpected death in epilepsy).

Will epilepsy shorten my life?

Epilepsy can shorten life, but most of the time it does not. Be aware of risks and take sensible precautions, but do not let the risks put you into a state of constant worry. Consult with your doctor for specific information about your risk factors for injury due to seizures.

How do epileptics die?

Most people with epilepsy live a full and healthy life. However, you should be aware that people can die from epilepsy. Some people with epilepsy may lose their lives from accidents, suicide, or the underlying cause of their condition, such as brain tumors or infections.

Can epilepsy go away?

While many forms of epilepsy require lifelong treatment to control the seizures, for some people the seizures eventually go away. The odds of becoming seizure-free are not as good for adults or for children with severe epilepsy syndromes, but it is possible that seizures may decrease or even stop over time.

What famous person has epilepsy?

12 Famous Faces of EpilepsyLil Wayne. Rap superstar Lil Wayne recently came clean about the condition he has dealt with for much of his life. … Theodore Roosevelt. … Dai Greene. … Danny Glover. … Jason Snelling. … Neil Young. … Susan Boyle. … Rick Harrison.More items…•

Do epileptics die younger?

The overall risk of dying is 1.6 to 3 times higher in people with epilepsy than in the general population (IOM Report, 2013; Forsgren et al, 2005). The risk of dying among children with epilepsy may be a bit higher since most children without epilepsy have very low risks.

What is the safest seizure medication?

“[Lamictal] seems to be the winner,” Marson says. The second trial looked at 716 patients newly diagnosed with generalized epilepsy. It compared the older drug valproic acid (in the U.S., Depakote is the most popular member of this drug family) to Lamictal and Topamax.

Do seizures kill brain cells?

Isolated brief seizures probably do not kill neurons; however, severe and repetitive seizures (i.e., status epilepticus) certainly do. Because status epilepticus both kills neurons and also leads to chronic epilepsy, neuronal death has been proposed to be an integral part of acquired epileptogenesis.